David Scanavino – NADA Art Fair

Solo Presentation

December 3 - December 6, 2009

David Scanavino with Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery at NADA Miami Beach, installation view, 2009
David Scanavino, untitled, 2009 ultracal 36 x 36 x 8 inches
David Scanavino, untitled, 2009 concrete, wax, plywood, varnish 24 x 36 x 24 inches
David Scanavino with Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery at NADA Miami Beach, installation view, 2009
David Scanavino, untitled (one square foot), 2009 VCT tile, mdf, glue 12 x 12 x 12 inches
David Scanavino, untitled (Financial Times), 2009 newspaper pulp applied directly to wall
David Scanavino, untitled (Financial Times), 2009 newspaper pulp applied directly to wall 22 1/3 x 13 3/8 inches

Press Release

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery is pleased to present a solo presentation of new work by David Scanavino at this year’s NADA Art Fair. The booth floor will be covered in black linoleum tile, a medium frequently used in Scanavino’s sculptures. These tiles act both as institutional signifiers and as readymade units of visual composition in his artworks. By using the tile as both an environmental and sculptural element the viewer’s perception of their own physical placement is brought into focus. Contained within the black expanse of the floor tile will be two sculptures derived from casting the space around lengths of nautical rope. The resulting forms fossilize a gesture made by the artist, while defining the mass of the rope through its absence.

On the walls are seven pieces which begin from one day’s edition of the Financial Times. Each piece is created with the reconstituted pulp of a full paper, and sculpted to the flat size of the front page. The difference in photographic content from one day to the next results in a tonal shift from piece to piece creating a temporally unique record of the day of its making. While six pieces are sculpted directly on the wall, the seventh piece is a photographic representation of the pulpy rectangle as constructed on Scanavino’s studio wall in Brooklyn, furthering the formal distance between artist, object and viewer.